Database and Repository Installation (Advanced)

Overview

Before proceeding with this installation, it is highly recommended to read through the Render Farm Considerations documentation.

The Database is the global database component of the Deadline Render Farm Management System. It stores the jobs, settings, and slave configurations. The Clients access the Database via a direct socket connection over the network. It only needs to be installed on one machine (preferably a server), and does not require a license. Deadline uses MongoDB for the Database.

The Repository is the global file system component of the Deadline Render Farm Management System. It stores the plugins, scripts, logs, and any auxiliary files (like scene files) that are submitted with the jobs. The Clients access the Repository via a shared network path. It only needs to be installed on one machine (preferably a server), and does not require a license.

The Database and Repository together act as a global system where all of Deadline’s data is stored. The Clients then connect to this system to submit, render, and monitor jobs. It is important to note that while the Database and Repository work together, they are still separate components, and therefore can be installed on separate machines if desired.

NOTE: The Repository installer requires an internet connection to download and install the MongoDB database. If your operating system isn’t supported, or if an internet connection isn’t available, you must manually install the database by following the Manual Database Installation documentation. When running the Repository installer, you can then choose the option to connect to an existing MongoDB database.

Installation

While the Repository can be installed on any operating system, the Repository installer is only available for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. However, the machine that you run the Repository installer on doesn’t have to be the same machine you’re installing the Repository to. For example, if you have an existing share on a FreeBSD server or a NAS system, you can run the Repository installer on Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X and choose that share as the install location.

To install the Repository, simply run the appropriate installer for your operating system and follow the steps. This procedure is identical for all operating systems. The Repository installer also supports silent installations.

setup directory

When choosing the Installation Directory, you can choose either a local path on the current machine, or the path to an existing network share. Note that if you choose a local path, you must ensure that path is shared on the network so that the Clients can access it. Do not install over an existing installation unless it’s the same major version, or there could be unexpected results.

If you’re installing over an existing Repository installation, all previous binaries, plug-ins, and scripts will be backed up prior to being overwritten. After the installation is complete, you can find these backed up files in the Backup folder in the Repository installation root. Note that installing over an existing repository is only supported for repairing a damaged repository, or for performing a minor upgrade. Major upgrades require a fresh repository installation. See the Upgrading or Downgrading Deadline Documentation for more information.

After choosing the Repository Installation directory, you will be asked to install a new MongoDB Database, or connect to an existing one.

mongodb_setup

If you choose to install a new MongoDB Database, you can then choose to have the installer download MongoDB for you. Note though that this requires an internet connection.

If you do not have an internet connection on the machine you’re running the installer on, your other choice is to simply download the MongoDB pre-packaged binaries from another machine with an internet connection. Just make sure to download the .tgz or .zip file for your operating system (and not the .msi file if you’re installing on a Windows machine). After downloading the MongoDB package, copy it to the machine you’re running the installer on, and then specify the path to it in the Repository installer.

mongodb_install_type

No matter your choice, you will then be asked to choose an installation location and a port number. It is highly recommended that you choose a local directory to install the Database.

mongodb_settings

Next, you need to specify the Database Settings so that the installer can set up the Database.

mongodb_conn_settings

These settings will also be used by the Clients to connect to the database. The following are required:

  • Database Server: The host name or the IP address of the machine that the MongoDB database is running on. If desired, you can specify multiple entries and separate them with semicolons. There are a couple reasons to specify multiple entries:

    • You have machines on different subnets that need to access the database differently (ie: machines in the cloud might use a different host name than machines on the local network).
    • Some machines need to resolve the database machine by its host name, and others need to use its IP address.
Note that if there are IP addresses listed that cannot be resolved, the Deadline Command application can run slower on Linux and Mac OS X Clients because it won’t exit until the connection attempt for those IP addresses time out.
  • Database Port: The port that the MongoDB database is listening on.
  • Database Name: The name of the Database. If you are setting up a new Database, you can leave this as the default. If you are connecting to an existing Database, make sure to enter the same name you used when you initially set up the Database. If you are intending to setup 2 or more repositories completely separate from each other, then ensure you enter a different/unique name for your new database.
  • Replica Set: If you set up your MongoDB database manually and it is part of a Replica Set, specify the Replica Set Name here. If you don’t have Replica Set, just leave this blank.

When you press Next, the installer will try to connect to the database using these settings to configure it. This can take a minute or two. If an error occurs, you will be prompted with the error message. If the setup succeeds, you can then proceed with the installation of the Repository.

Command Line or Silent Installation

The Repository installer can be run in command line mode or unattended mode on each operating system. Note though that on Mac OS X, you must run the installbuilder.sh script that can be found in the Contents/MacOS folder, which is inside the Mac Repository Installer package.

To run in silent mode, pass the “–mode unattended” command line option to the installer. For example, on Windows:

DeadlineRepository-X.X.X.X-windows-installer.exe --mode unattended

To run in command line mode, pass the “–mode text” command line option to the installer. For example, on Linux:

./DeadlineRepository-X.X.X.X-linux-x64-installer.run --mode text

To get a list of all available command line options, pass the “–help” command line option to the installer. For example, on Mac OS X:

/DeadlineRepository-X.X.X.X-osx-installer.app/Contents/MacOS/installbuilder.sh --help

Note that there are a few Repository installer options that are only available from the command line, which you can view when running the “–help” command. These options include:

  • --help: Display the list of valid options.
  • --version: Display product information.
  • --unattendedmodeui <unattendedmodeui>: Unattended Mode UI. Default: none. Allowed: none minimal minimalWithDialogs.
  • --optionfile <optionfile>: Installation option file. Default: "".
  • --debuglevel <debuglevel>: Debug information level of verbosity. Default: 2. Allowed: 0 1 2 3 4.
  • --mode <mode>: Installation mode. Default: osx. Allowed: osx text unattended.
  • --debugtrace <debugtrace>: Debug filename. Default: "".
  • --installer-language <installer-language>: Language selection. Default: en. Allowed: en.
  • --prefix <prefix>: The path to install the Repository to. Default: /Applications/Thinkbox/DeadlineRepository8 (Mac OS X), C:\Program Files\Thinkbox\DeadlineRepository8\ (Win) or /opt/Thinkbox/DeadlineRepository8\ (Linux).
  • --backuprepo <backuprepo>: If set to true, many folders in the Repository will be backed up before overwriting them. Default: true.
  • --setpermissions <setpermissions>: If set to true, access rights will be set to 777 for the repository directory. Default: false.
  • --installmongodb <installmongodb>: If set to true, new MongoDB instance will be installed. Skips DB installtion if there is an existing MongoDB instance. Default: false.
  • --dbOverwrite <dbOverwrite>: If set to true, overwrite the existing DB instance. Must use with the --installmongodb true option. Default: false.
  • --prepackagedDB <prepackagedDB>: Location of prepackaged MongoDB binaries (.tgz, .zip). If set, overrides dbInstallationType to prepackagedDB. Default: "".
  • --dbInstallationType <dbInstallationType>: Option doesn’t need to be used. Defaults to downloading the database. Specifying ‘prepackagedDB’ with an associated path will override this option. Default: downloadDB. Allowed: downloadDB prepackagedDB.
  • --mongodir <mongodir>: If MongoDB is being installed by this installer, this is the path it is installed to. Default: /Applications/Thinkbox/DeadlineDatabase8 (Mac OS X), C:\Program Files\Thinkbox\DeadlineDatabase8\ (Win) or /opt/Thinkbox/DeadlineDatabase8\ (Linux).
  • --backupdb <backupdb>: If set to true, the data in the existing Database will be backed up before overwriting it. Default: true.
  • --dbListeningPort <dbListeningPort>: MongoDB Port. Default: 27080.
  • --dbhost <dbhost>: The host name or IP address of the machine that MongoDB is running on. Default: "".
  • --dbport <dbport>: The port that MongoDB is listening on. Default: 27080.
  • --dbname <dbname>: The name of the MongoDB database that the data is stored in. Default: deadline8db.
  • --dbreplicaset <dbreplicaset>: The name of the MongoDB database replica set, if you have one set up. Default: "".
  • --dbuser <dbuser>: The user name to connect to MongoDB with. Default: "".
  • --dbpassword <dbpassword>: The password to connect to MongoDB with. Default: "".
  • --dbauth <dbauth>: If enabled, Deadline will use this account to connect to MongoDB. Default: false.
  • --dbsplit <dbsplit>: If enabled, the database collections will be split into separate databases to improve performance. Default: true.

Note, where applicable (contains spaces), it is recommended to encapsulate options in quoatation marks, such as:

--prefix "C:\Program Files\Thinkbox\DeadlineRepository8\" --mongodir "C:\Program Files\Thinkbox\DeadlineDatabase8\"

Installation Logging

Our Repository installer creates an installation log in the system’s temporary directory. On Linux and Mac OS X, this typically means the /tmp directory. On Windows, the log will be created in the user’s local temp directory, usually C:\Documents and Settings\%username%\Local Settings\Temp. The default name of the generated log file is bitrock_installer.log, but if the file already exists from a previous installation, the installer will try to create an unique filename trying bitrock_installer_[pid].log and bitrock_installer_[pid]_[uid].log where [pid] is the PID of the process and [uid] is an unique identifier. On Linux, if the /tmp directory is not writable, it will attempt to use /var/tmp, /usr/tmp and ~/tmp instead.

Database Resource Limits

Linux and Mac OS X systems impose a limit on the number of resources a process can use, and these limits can affect the number of open connections to the database. It is important to be aware of these limits, and make sure they are set appropriately to avoid unexpected behaviour. Note that MongoDB will allocate 80% of the system limit for connections, so if the system limit is 1024, the maximum number of connections will be 819.

If you choose a Linux system to host the database, make sure the system limits are configured properly to avoid connection issues. See MongoDB’s Linux ulimit Settings documentation for more information, as well as the recommended system limits to use.

You can check your current Linux/Mac OS X ulimit settings in a terminal shell:

#overall ulimit settings on the machine
>>> ulimit -a
#number of open files allowed
>>> ulimit -n

MongoDB provides these Recommended ulimit Settings for optimal performance of your database. Note, you must restart the Deadline Database daemon after changing these ulimit settings.

If you choose a Mac OS X system to host the database, and you use the Repository installer to install the database, the resource limits will be set to 1024. These limits can be adjusted later by manually editing the HardResourceLimits and SoftResourceLimits values in /Library/LaunchDaemons/org.mongodb.mongod.plist after the Repository installer has finished.

Open Firewall Ports

To ensure that the Deadline applications can communicate with MongoDB, you will need to update the firewall on the machine that MongoDB is running on. You can either disable the firewall completely (assuming it operates in an internal network), or you can open the port that you chose for the database to use during install. More information on opening ports can be found below.

Windows

Open Windows Firewall with Advanced Security. Click on Inbound Rules in the left panel to view all inbout rules, and then right-click on Inbound Rules and select New Rule to start the Inbound Rule Wizard. Select Port for the Rule Type, and then click Next.

new_rule rule_type

On the Protocol and Ports page, choose TCP, and then specify the port that you chose for the database during the install, and then press next. Then on the Action page, choose Allow The Connection and press Next.

rule_port rule_allow

On the Profile page, choose the networks that this rule applies to, and then press next. Then on the Name page, specify a name for the rule (for example, MongoDB Connection), and then press Finish.

rule_network rule_name

Linux

On RedHat and CentOS, the following commands should allow incoming connections to the Mongo database if iptables are being used. Just make sure to specify the port that you chose for the database during the install.

>>> sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -p tcp --dport 27080 -j ACCEPT
>>> sudo ip6tables -I INPUT 1 -p tcp --dport 27080 -j ACCEPT

Ubuntu has no firewall installed by default, and we have not yet tested Fedora Core’s FirewallD.

Mac OS X

Mac OS X has its firewall disabled by default, but if enabled, it is possible to open ports for specific applications. Open up System Preferences,, choose the Security & Privacy option, and click on the Firewall tab.

../_images/mac_firewall.png

Press the Firewall Options button to open the firewall options. Press the [+] button and choose the path to the mongod application, which can be found in the database installation folder in mongo/application/bin (for example, /Applications/Thinkbox/DeadlineDatabase8/mongo/application/bin/mongod). Then click OK to save your settings.

../_images/mac_firewall_options.png

Sharing The Repository

In general, the Repository must have open read and write permissions for Deadline to operate properly. This section explains how to share your Repository folder and configure its permissions to ensure the Clients have full access. Without full read/write access, the Client applications will not be able to function properly.

Note that this guide is for applying full read/write permissions to the entire Repository folder structure. For the more advanced user, it is possible to enforce tighter restrictions on the Repository folders. Just make sure the Clients have full read/write access to the following folders in the Repository. The rest must have at least read access.

  • jobs: This is where job auxiliary files are copied to during submission.
  • jobsArchived: This is where archived jobs are exported to.
  • reports: This is where the physical log files for job and slave reports are saved to.

Windows

First, you need to configure the Repository folder permissions. Note that the images shown here are from Windows XP, but the procedure is basically the same for any version of Windows.

  • On the machine where the Repository is installed, navigate to the folder where it is installed using Windows Explorer.
  • Right-click on the Repository folder and select Properties from the menu.
  • Select the Security tab.
../_images/windows_initial_security_screen.png
  • If there is already an Everyone item under Group or user names, you can skip the next two steps.
  • Click on the Add button.
  • In the resulting dialog, type Everyone and click OK.
../_images/select_users_or_groups.png
  • Select Everyone under Group or user names.
  • Ensure that Modify, Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, Read, and Write are all checked under the Allow column.
  • Click on the OK button to save the settings.
../_images/finish_security_screen.png

Second, you need to share the Repository folder. Note that the images shown here are from Windows XP, but the procedure is basically the same for any version of Windows.

  • On the machine where the Repository is installed, navigate to the folder where it is installed using Windows Explorer.
  • Right-click on the Repository folder and select Properties from the menu. If you’re unable to see the Sharing tab, you may need to disable Simple File Sharing in the Explorer Folder Options.
../_images/folder_options.png
  • Select the Sharing tab.
../_images/windows_repo_props.png
  • Select the option to Share This Folder, then specify the share name.
  • Click the Permissions button.
  • Give Full Control to the Everyone user.
  • Press OK on the Permissions dialog and then the Properties dialog.
../_images/windows_permission.png

Linux

Since the Clients expects full read and write access to the repository, it’s recommended to use a single user account to mount shares across all machines. It is possible to add particular users to a ‘deadline’ group, but you will need to experiment with that on your own.

So for both of the sharing mechanisms we explain below, you’ll need to create a user and a group named ‘deadline’. They don’t need a login or credentials, we just need to be able to set files to be owned by them and for their account to show up in /etc/passwd. So, to do this use the useradd command.

>>> sudo useradd -d /dev/null -c "Deadline Repositry User" -M deadline

This should create a user named “deadline” with no home folder, and a fancy comment. The account login should also be disabled, meaning your standard users can’t ssh or ftp into your file server using this account. Set a password using sudo passwd deadline if you need your users to login as deadline using ftp or ssh.

Now add a group using

>>> sudo groupadd deadline

And finally, have the Repository owned by this new user and group

>>> sudo chown -R deadline:deadline /path/to/repository
>>> sudo chmod -R 777 /path/to/repository

Now you’re ready to set up your network sharing protocol. There are a many ways this can be done, and this just covers a few of them.

Samba Share

This is an example entry in the /etc/samba/smb.conf file:

[DeadlineRepository]
path = /path/to/repository
writeable = Yes
guest ok = Yes
create mask = 0777
force create mode = 0777
force directory mode = 0777
unix extensions = No

NFS Share

The simplest thing that could possibly work. Note that this is not the most secure thing that could possibly work:

If you do not have a /etc/exports file, you may need to install an NFS server. To do so, open a terminal or your favourite package manager to install one. For Ubuntu Server, type the following:

>>> sudo apt-get install nfs-kernel-server

For a CentOS Server:

>>> sudo yum install nfs-utils

For Linux and BSD, open up /etc/exports as an administrator, and make one new export:

/path/to/repository                  192.168.2.0/24(rw,all_squash,insecure)

Breakdown of this command is as follows:

  • /path/to/repository: The Repository folder to share. Change the path as necessary.
  • 192.168.2.0/24: The IP range to allow. The zero is important for these ranges. You can also go by hostname if you have reverse DNS, or * to allow from anyone’s computer.
  • rw: Allow read/write for the repository, which is required for the Clients to operate properly.
  • all_squash: Make every single person who connects to the Repository share map to the nobody:nogroup user and group. This relieves a lot of permissions pain for new users at the cost of zero security. Files and folders within your repository will be fully readable and writeable by whomever is able to connect to your NFS server. The Clients require this, but it can also be achieved by creating a group and adding individual users into that group. Many studios will only need all_squash as Deadline will keep track of who submits what jobs.
  • insecure: Required for Mac OS X to mount nfs shares. It simply means that NFS doesn’t need to receive requests on a port in the secure port range (a port number less than 1024).

Then start up the server (for those living in an init.d world):

>>> sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server start

Any time you change the exports file, you’ll need to issue the same command, but replace ‘start’ with ‘reload’.

There is an excellent tutorial here as well: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SettingUpNFSHowTo

Mac OS X

First, you need to configure the Repository folder permissions. Note that the images shown here are from Leopard (10.5), but the procedure is basically the same for any version of Mac OS X.

  • On the machine where the Repository is installed, navigate to the folder where it is installed using Finder.
  • Right-click on the Repository folder and select Get Info from the menu.
  • Expand the Sharing & Permissions section, and unlock the settings if necessary.
  • Give everyone Read & Write privileges.
  • While probably not necessary, also give admin Read & Write privileges.
../_images/initial_security_screen_mac.png

If you prefer to set the permissions from the Terminal, run the following commands:

$ chown -R nobody:nogroup /path/to/repository
$ chmod -R 777 /path/to/repository

Now you can share the folder. There are a many ways this can be done, and this just covers a few of them.

Using System Preferences

Note that the images shown here are from Leopard (10.5), but the procedure is basically the same for any version of Mac OS X.

  • Open System Preferences, and select the Sharing option.
  • Make sure File Sharing is enabled, and then add the Repository folder to the list of shared folders.
  • Under Users, give everyone Read & Write privileges.
  • If sharing with Windows machines, press the Options button and make sure the “Share files and folders using SMB (Windows)” is enabled.
../_images/mac_sharing.png

Samba Share

Interestingly, Mac OS X uses samba as well. Apple just does a good job of hiding it. To create a samba share in Mac OS X, past this at the bottom of /etc/smb.conf:

[DeadlineRepository]
path = /path/to/repository
writeable = Yes
guest ok = Yes
create mask = 0777
force create mode = 0777
force directory mode = 0777
unix extensions = No

Uninstallation

The Repository installer creates an uninstaller in the folder that you installed the Repository to. To uninstall the Repository, simply run the uninstaller and confirm that you want to proceed with the uninstallation.

../_images/uninstall_repo.png

Note that if you installed the Database with the Repository installer, it will be uninstalled as well. If you chose to connect to a Database that you manually installed, the Database will be unaffected.

Command Line or Silent Uninstallation

The Repository uninstaller can be run in command line mode or unattended mode on each operating system.

To run in command line mode, pass the “–mode text” command line option to the installer. For example, on Linux:

./uninstall --mode text

To run in silent mode, pass the “–mode unattended” command line option to the installer. For example, on Windows:

uninstall.exe --mode unattended

To get a list of all available command line options as a pop-up dialog, pass the “–help” command line option to the installer. For example, on Windows:

uninstall.exe --help

To get a list of all available command line options in the terminal, pass the “–help” command line option to the installer and an additional option when on Mac OS X:

./uninstall osx-intel --help

Note that there are a few Repository uninstall options that are only available from the command line, which you can view when running the “–help” command. These options include:

  • --help: Display the list of valid options.
  • --version: Display product information.
  • --debuglevel <debuglevel>: Debug information level of verbosity. Default: 2. Allowed: 0 1 2 3 4.
  • --mode <mode>: Installation mode. Default: osx. Allowed: osx text unattended.
  • --debugtrace <debugtrace>: Debug filename. Default: "".
  • --installer-language <installer-language>: Language selection. Default: en. Allowed: en.

Uninstall Logging

Our Repository uninstall process creates an uninstall log in the system’s temporary directory with the same behaviour as the Repository Installation log.